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In the past week, President Michel Aoun of Lebanon renewed his call for Syrian refugees to return to Syria, as Lebanon believes the Syrian refugees have had serious repercussions on Lebanese society and economy.

The Lebanese President ordered this despite a US State Department warning that this is not a good time for Syrians to return.  Syria is currently in the ninth year of civil war and is extremely unsafe.

Despite the danger of life in Syria, the number of Syrian refugees in Lebanon has recently decreased dramatically, to 890,000.   Hundreds have returned to their homeland, viewing it as the better option as life in Lebanon has become increasingly unsafe and untenable for them.

The border between Lebanon and Syria still remains closed due to the coronavirus pandemic but is opened for Lebanese returning to their country and Syrians returning to Syria.

The American Foundation for Relief and Reconciliation in the Middle East assists Syrian refugees in Kurdistan, Jordan, and other countries where they have fled.  It also works with the Syrian Orthodox Church in Amman to assist Syrian Orthodox Christian refugees from Iraq. The organization and its partners assist these individuals by providing life-saving humanitarian assistance, to help them overcome horrific circumstances and obtain a better life. These resources are made possible by the generous donations of faithful donors.

American FRRME is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that promotes reconciliation, provides relief efforts, advances human rights, and seeks an end to sectarian violence in the Middle East.

To make a donation to American FRRME, please visit https://donatenow.networkforgood.org/frrmeamerica?code=WebsiteGeneral

The Syrian Crisis Worsens

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With a severe bread shortage caused by many bakeries suspending work because of a lack of flour and a rise in the price of baking materials, Syria currently faces the risk of mass starvation or another mass exodus. Anti-regime protests have taken place across the country over the past six weeks as civilians risk arrest to protest Syria’s worsening economic crisis.

Since the start of the Syrian civil war in 2011, more than 380,000 Syrians have been killed and a staggering 13.2 million have been displaced, with 80 percent of Syrians living in poverty.  Making the situation worse, Syria’s currency recently collapsed, causing food prices to soar.  In the past six months, the number of people struggling with food shortage in Syria has risen from 7.9 million to 9.3 million. Half a million children are considered to be stunted by malnutrition. In desperation, many Syrians have no choice but to flee to neighboring countries like Jordan, as many did in 2015.

The American Foundation for Relief and Reconciliation in the Middle East does not have a center in Syria.   However, American FRRME is increasingly helping a number of Syrian refugees in Kurdistan and also does work with the Syrian Orthodox Church in Amman to assist Syrian Orthodox Christian refugees from Iraq. The organization and its partners assist these refugees in Jordan and other countries by providing life-saving humanitarian assistance to help them overcome horrific circumstances and obtain a better life. These resources are made possible by generous donations by faithful donors.

American FRRME is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that promotes reconciliation, provides relief efforts, advances human rights, and seeks an end to sectarian violence in the Middle East.

To make a donation to American FRRME, please visit https://donatenow.networkforgood.org/frrmeamerica?code=WebsiteGeneral

The Syrian Civil War Crisis

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One of the worst humanitarian crises of modern time has been going on for ten years, as of March 2020. This crisis is the Syrian civil war. Over the total course of this catastrophic war, 12 million Syrians have been displaced from their homes. Over the past few months, this already astronomic number has increased dramatically. From December 2019 to February 2020, over 900,000 people have been forced to flee as the conflict increased. Their homes are bombed out and they are left with no necessities. Of these refugees, 5.6 million of them have fled to neighboring countries such as Turkey, Lebanon, and Jordan. Turkey alone is home to more than 3 million Syrian refugees. Lebanon and Jordan host 1.6 million. Many of these are Christian refugees, often families with young children, who are caught in the middle with nowhere safe to flee.

Syria is a dangerous region for everyone, but most especially Christians.  Before the Syrian civil war, more than 20,000 Christian families lived in northeastern Syria.   Christians have been in this region since the first century AD.   Over the course of the civil war, ISIS has targeted, enslaved and brutally murdered many Christians in attempts to take control of the region.  For example, bombings in 2015 and 2016 specifically targeted Christians.   Today, sadly, only 7000 to 8000 Christian families remain in northeastern Syria.  Now, according to recent reports, Hayat Tahrir al-Sham (a terrorist organization) has started seizing Christian properties in the area.  It considers them to be spoils of war.  This has resulted in the displacement of more families.

Syria is currently the fifth most dangerous place in the world to be a Christian.  Christians are fleeing Syria in hopes of a better life.  To help them achieve this, the American Foundation for Relief and Reconciliation in the Middle East partners with churches and other NGOs in Jordan and other neighboring countries, but this is only made possible by donations. Please donate today to help these religious refugees.

American FRRME is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that promotes reconciliation, provides relief efforts, advances human rights, and seeks an end to sectarian violence in the Middle East.

To make a donation to American FRRME, please visit https://donatenow.networkforgood.org/frrmeamerica?code=WebsiteGeneral